Latitude 64 Sinus Review

Latitude 64 Sinus

One of the original discs produced by Latitude 64, the Sinus offers a clean overstable putter that should help when it’s windy outside.

Manufacturer’s Notes

“Sinus is a putter with three grip areas on top with different textures. This gives players an option to find the grip and feel they prefer. Between the grip areas the disc is regularly smooth for players who prefer a smooth grip. The flight is quite overstable making it useful in windy conditions.”

http://www.latitude64.se/discs/puttapproach/

Available plastics: Zero Soft, Zero Medium, Zero Hard

Flight Rating: 2 speed, 1 glide, 0 turn, 3 fade

Initial Reactions

When you actually handle the disc, you’ll notice the “grip areas” mentioned by Latitude 64.  The disc has a shallow rim with light beveling on the bottom edge.

Latitude 64 Sinus Profile

 

First, a little Sinus lore.  The first run of the disc said the following Latin phrase: “is mos non sinus obvius ventus” translated by Google translate to say “it will not allow access to the wind”

User Alcuin on dgcoursereview.com noted to Latitude 64 that the phrase isn’t proper Latin, even though Google translate worked properly.  He suggested they change it to “non sinet tactus venti” to say something similarly in proper Latin.  All newer runs have the new phrase so if you have an early run of this disc it may be worth keeping.

And now you know

 

By the Numbers

Flight chart courtesy of inbounds Disc Golf

Putting Notes

In 2005, Latitude 64 released the Sinus to help players combat the wind and potentially the affect of precipitation.  The grip areas on the top offer a unique way to grip the disc when the weather changes.  I found myself using the smooth surface for the majority of testing but the ability to choose is a nice touch.

Brand new, the Sinus putts rather overstable.  I’d liken it to the Westside Discs Harp inside the circle.  Something this overstable produces some inconsistent results as I move past the 20-25′ mark but you may prefer the overstable flight path.

The low glide and overstable tendencies give the Sinus a leg up in the wind – which shouldn’t be a surprise since the company intended to create a wind putter.  The rim is comfortable and I didn’t have any release problems in several practice rounds with the putter.

It could be the Zero Hard plastic or the mold itself, but the Sinus tends to roll a little bit when it lands on end.  Certainly something to be mindful of when putting near hills.

 

Upshots

The most interesting thing I found with the Sinus is how well it works as an escape roller.  It seems easier to get this putter rolling than some other discs I’ve tried.  When attempting to escape from the trees the Sinus provides another option along the ground.

Throwing the Sinus from the fairway or the tee offers another experience similar to the Harp.  I’d consider the Harp more overstable, but the Sinus will flex out of an anhyzer or hold a hyzer very well.  Flick shots were successful and the forehand grip on the Sinus is comfortable too.  At the end of its flight, the putter tends to fade and drop easily with minimal risk of skipping away.  That said, it doesn’t seem like the 1 glide rating is quite accurate, I’d call it closer to a 2 or even 3.

One thing to note: I’ve had a Sinus around for quite a while and the disc does break in and lose its overstability over time.  Yes, all plastic has this property, but this one seems to break down a little more than others.  The Sinus tends to straighten out and even turn over in the wind after the plastic wears down.

 

Final Verdict

I think the Latitude 64 Sinus is a solid disc and would have been a great option in 2005 when it was produced.  At this point, there are several better options worth trying like the previously mentioned Harp, the Dynamic Discs Suspect or the Discraft Zone.  None of those, however, have the grip areas that are useful during inclement weather.

 

 

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